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Here’s what the coronavirus pandemic was like for a Wall St. billionaire


Poor little rich boy!

A Wall Street billionaire whined about being forced to drive himself around and learn Zoom amid the pandemic that’s cost a half a million people their lives and crippled the economy.

An unnamed bigwig dubbed “one of America’s richest men” by Bloomberg spoke to the outlet about his biggest worries during the coronavirus outbreak — which included not having anywhere to go on his private jet.

“Now if you’re on a bus and you start sneezing, everybody gets upset,” he whined in mid-March — before admitting that he didn’t take the bus.

The investor spoke with Bloomberg throughout the outbreak, providing insight into what the pandemic was like for some of the nation’s wealthiest, according to the article published Tuesday.

But the man requested anonymity as “Americans were too angry at rich bosses” in the current climate, the outlet said.

From his country home outside New York City, he told the author about having to drive himself to the store, since there was no staff around, and how “he could have hopped in his private jet and escaped, but really, he pointed out, where was he going to go?”

He also moaned about having to work remotely and not being able to “get five people in a room” — though he eventually seemed to get used to, and enjoy, software like Zoom.

When people had first started taking notice of the virus, he told Bloomberg: “I’m not worried.”

He later admitted that, “Some people are going to die.”

“But it’s old people,” he continued. “And if they do, it’s OK.” After a pause, he added: “Not that it’s OK. This isn’t that bad.”

There didn’t seem to be a reason to stress. The billionaire said “I could get my hand on a test,” adding that some of his rich buddies were quietly asking about reserving beds at private hospitals in case they got sick.

The article states that: “He had connections to the boards of the best hospitals but said he’d call in favors only for the people closest to him.”

By May 22, when the jobless rate had hit levels not seen since the Great Depression, he told the website: “Everything is going great.”

The plan at work was to try to “take advantage of the situation,” he continued, at a time when 325,000 people around the world had died of the virus.

“I used the wrong words,” he said when questioned about his choice of words. “It’s not ‘take advantage.’ It’s a huge opportunity for us. That’s what it is.”

But that many Americans are suffering — with more than 30 percent of the nation’s workforce sidelined since mid-March — while a select few are getting richer, is just part and parcel for this business bro.

“Is war fair? Do people die in a war? Yes,” he told the outlet.

“You’ve got a virus that is affecting people. It’s pretty clear who it affects,” he continued, referring to the sick and elderly.

“So nature is saying, ‘I’m going to pick on you.’ Is it fair? Is it right? No — but that’s life.”

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