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Coronavirus impossible to stop ‘until most of world is infected’ and now out of control in many countries, expert warns

CORONAVIRUS is impossible to stop until most of the world has been infected, one expert warns.

Some infectious disease experts give a dire prediction that the deadly bug will continue to spread and is now almost impossible to contain in many countries.

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Professor Peter Collignon believes this virus is going to keep on spreading until most of the world is infected unless a vaccineis developed [/caption]

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Some infectious disease experts give a dire prediction that the deadly bug will continue to spread[/caption]

The number of those infected passed ten million across the globe this week, with deaths at a staggering half a million.

Professor Peter Collignon, an infectious diseases physician and microbiologist at the Australian National University, said only a low percentage of the world’s population has been infected by COVID-19.

The microbiologist believes the potential for the virus to spread is huge and doesn’t believe it is slowing down in the summer in the northern hemisphere.

“Normally you would expect these viruses to spread more in winter, but we’ve seen that they can spread readily in summer as well,” he told news.com.au.

“What it shows unfortunately is that this virus is not going anywhere soon.

“The reality is that this is going to keep on spreading until we have most of the world infected, which is not a good idea, or we get a safe and effective vaccine.”

This virus is not going anywhere soon … this is going to keep on spreading until we have most of the world infected.


Professor Peter Collignon

Third world nations are also struggling to contain the virus and with minimal resources are fighting an impossible battle to stop its spread.

Professor Stephen Leeder, an emeritus professor of public health and community medicine at the University of Sydney, said the nature of the impact on developing nations is worrying.

“We’re looking at the intersection of all sorts of social conditions like poverty and overcrowding mixed with a very nasty virus,” he explained.

“The more that it goes into the developing world, where they don’t have the advantages that we have in terms of being able to track, trace and isolate, you have to say that the numbers rising like this is not surprising, but they are distressing.”

The Professor pointed to the never-seen-before nature of the virus, calling it “unique” and noting “we had nothing to estimate how far it would spread or how lethal it would be until we had some figures coming out of China”.

‘NOT CLOSE TO BEING OVER’

World Health Organisation director-general Tedros Adhanom Ghebreyesus reiterated the warning this week that the pandemic is “not even close to being over”.

This week marks six months since the World Health Organisation was first informed of the outbreak in the Chinese city of Wuhan.

“Six months ago, none of us could have imagined how our world – and our lives – would be thrown into turmoil by this new virus,” Ghebreyesus told reporters.


“We all want this to be over. We all want to get on with our lives. But the hard reality is this is not even close to being over.

“Globally the pandemic is actually speeding up.

“We’re all in this together, and we’re all in this for the long haul. We have already lost so much – but we cannot lose hope.”

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This week marks six months since the World Health Organisation was first informed of the outbreak in Wuhan, China[/caption]



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